The latest scientific highlights on muons

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  • 18.12.2017From: ISIS MuonsNeutrons, muons and the battery revolution
    Neutrons, muons and the battery revolution

    Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is used in almost all if not all electronic personal devices and is starting to be used in electric and hybrid vehicles. By 2018 the global demand for Li-ion battery power (for consumer and electric vehicle use) is expected to reach 100 GW hours. They may well also have an important role to play as storage devices for renewable energy. As our Christmas lights shine in the dwindling daylight it begs the question “what happens to our renewable energy supply when the wind doesn't blow or the Sun doesn't shine?" ...

  • 24.01.2017From: SINE2020High pressure research using muons at PSI
    High pressure research using muons at PSI

    As part of the SINE2020 Sample Environment activities, a team at the Paul Scherrer Institute published a review of high pressure µSR experiments.

  • 22.06.2016From: LLBMagnetic ground state and spin fluctuations in MnGe chiral magnet as studied by muon spin rotation
    Magnetic ground state and spin fluctuations in MnGe chiral magnet as studied by muon spin rotation

    Scientists have studied by muon spin resonance the helical ground state and fluctuating chiral phase recently observed in the MnGe chiral magnet.

  • 27.10.2015From: NMI3Superconductivity can promote magnetization, paving the way to energy-efficient supercomputers
    Superconductivity can promote magnetization, paving the way to energy-efficient supercomputers

    Researchers obtained surprising results when using muons to investigate the relation between superconductivity and magnetization.

  • 21.09.2015From: SµS, Swiss Muon Source (PSI)Tiny magnets mimic steam, water and ice
    Tiny magnets mimic steam, water and ice

    Researchers at PSI created a synthetic material out of 1 billion tiny magnets. Astonishingly, it now appears that its magnetic properties change with the temperature, so that it can take on different states.

  • 06.08.2015From: NMI3Magnets made of non-magnetic metals
    Magnets made of non-magnetic metals

    Muons were essential to show how non-magnetic metals become magnetic. The results of the experiments at PSI were published in Nature.

  • 01.03.2015From: ISIS MuonsProbing the past with negative muons
    Probing the past with negative muons

    Muon scientists, together with the Universities of Oxford and Warwick, are currently developing the technique on the RIKEN Port 4 to non-destructively probe the composition of archaeological objects – including gold and silver coins from the Roman period and the Mary Rose – paving the way for future studies on other archaeological artefacts, engineering samples, bio-systems, and battery materials...

  • 14.11.2014From: NMI3Muons help understand mechanism behind hydrogen storage
    Muons help understand mechanism behind hydrogen storage

    Contrarily to what was previously thought, hydrogenation could be more effective at low temperatures.

  • 24.10.2014From: SµS, Swiss Muon Source (PSI)Strange bedfellows
    Strange bedfellows

    LMU chemists have synthesized a ferromagnetic superconducting compound that is amenable to chemical modification, opening the route to detailed studies of this rare combination of physical properties.

  • 07.04.2014From: ISIS MuonsMight muons and a microwave make marvellous materials?
    Might muons and a microwave make marvellous materials?

    A group led by Dr Serena Corr, Glasgow University, have synthesised nanoparticles of the battery material, LiFePO4, using a microwave synthesis method and investigated the diffusion of lithium in this nanostructure for the first time using muons. By looking at how these battery materials work at the atomic scale they hope to develop better battery materials in the future. The research has been published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A...

  • 03.02.2014From: ISIS MuonsMuons make the most of waste heat
    Muons make the most of waste heat

    One way to improve efficiency is through the use of thermoelectric materials, which convert waste heat directly into electricity. Scientists from the University of East Anglia have been working with the muon group at ISIS to understand a new type of thermoelectric material that could take advantage of waste heat from, for example, furnaces, car exhausts or solar cells, improving overall efficiency and helping in the move towards a low carbon economy?..

  • 08.12.2013From: ISIS MuonsISIS: Making Muons for a quarter of a century.
    ISIS: Making Muons for a quarter of a century.

    To mark the publication of a special edition of Physica Scripta, ISIS muons for materials and molecular sciences, ISIS looks back on the last 25 years of muons and their achievements...

  • 17.09.2012From: ISIS MuonsFrontiers of muon spectroscopy – symposium and user meeting
    Frontiers of muon spectroscopy – symposium and user meeting

    A symposium discussing current research with muons across various disciplines, held at St Hugh's College, Oxford. The meeting was held in recognition of 25 years of muon science at ISIS and to mark the recent retirement of Steve Cox. Proceedings of the meeting will be available in Physica Scripta.

  • 08.05.2013From: ISIS MuonsSolar flares, muons and micro-electronics – what’s the connection?
    Solar flares, muons and micro-electronics – what’s the connection?

    Here on Earth, such spectacular solar flares seem far away but in fact these extra-terrestrial events are a cause for concern in our modern digital world...

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